first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts david nield Tags:#Apple#Apple Proactive#Cortana#digital assistants#Google#Google Now#Microsoft#Siri What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces iOS already has its own personal assistant app in the form of Siri, but it seems Apple wants a more direct competitor to Google Now: 9to5Mac reports that a new service called Proactive is on the way.With deep ties to Siri, Contacts, Calendar, Passbook and third-party apps, Proactive would reportedly surface timely and relevant information in the same way that Google Now does. This could be hugely useful on the Apple Watch as well as the iPhone and iPad.While Google Now and Siri have several features in common, Apple’s app concentrates on controlling devices and running searches using voice input. Google Now focuses more on being an intelligent assistant, mining collected location, search and email data to automatically show alerts (like flight delays) when they’re needed.And that appears to be what Proactive is targeting. “Proactive will automatically provide timely information based on the user’s data and device usage patterns, but will respect the user’s privacy preferences, according to sources familiar with Apple’s plans,” says 9to5Mac.The roots of Proactive can be traced back to Apple’s 2013 acquisition of personal assistant app Cue, which enabled users to “know what’s next” based on calendar and email information. With the notification and search capabilities inside iOS growing, Proactive is a logical next step.Battle Of The Digital AssistantsCortana on Android.Google Now has become the major component of stock Android—the unmodified version of Android that Google is increasingly pushing on phone makers—and is available on iOS devices and inside the Chrome browser too. With Microsoft’s Cortana assistant spreading out to Windows 10, iOS and Android, it’s time for Apple to make a move.Siri has always been seen as Apple’s Cortana or Apple’s Google Now, but it lacks the smart, pre-emptive elements found in Microsoft and Google’s products. Proactive would plug that gap—9to5Mac says it will show estimated travel times to scheduled events in exactly the same way that Google Now does.It’s another sign of the growing importance of these digital assistants and the ecosystems they tap into: Will we be choosing our next phones based on the digital assistant we get on best with? Or the one that knows most about us from our emails and searches?9to5Mac says Proactive could even rearrange apps based on the time of day and usage patterns, and that third-party app integration will be an important element of the new service. If Proactive arrives with iOS 9, as is expected, we’ll be hearing about it at WWDC.We’ll have to wait and see just how comprehensive the new app ends up being, and how well it competes with Google Now and Cortana. One thing we can predict with a good degree of certainty: It will only be available on Apple’s platforms.Images courtesy of Apple and Microsoft Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagementlast_img read more

first_imgFor Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Donal Power Tags:#Apple#Autonomous vehicle#Baidu#BMW#Chrysler#Didi#Didi Chuxing#General Motors#Gett#Google#IoT#Lyft#self-driving cars#Uber#Volkswagen As the world’s biggest players in IT and the car makers dive frantically into self-driving cars, a new report estimates this market will grow to an astonishing $2.6 trillion annually within 15 years.The site Gas2.org reports the startling growth prospects for self-driving cars revealed in a new Mogran Stanley report led by Katy Huberty.Her research team estimates that the global shared mobility market will reach $$2.6 trillion annually by 2030.Much of what’s superficially driving this market is disruptive technology and business models of companies like Uber and Lyft. These companies have muscled into the traditional taxi market in big cities worldwide and shown a thriving willingness for tech savvy citizens to pay for new types of services.More importantly, Uber’s disruptive approach has broken open the car-buying paradigm in big cities, and exposed an increasing desire by urban dwellers to reduce vehicle ownership or skip it all together. And as individual car ownership is expected to wane, this will be countered by a corresponding rise in vehicles sold to shared mobility networks.Demand seems strong – but trillions?Earlier this spring, Uber’s CEO boldly pronounced that if Tesla developed an autonomous car by 2020 Uber would by the entire manufacturing run. Following this Tesla guru Elon Musk coyly hinted that electric car company may be poised to enter into the race to develop self-driving cars.Another new contender in the car market is Apple, which invested $1 billion in Didi Chuxing, a Chinese ride hailing service. Not only will that deal allow Apple to integrate its existing technology in a new market, but it will provide vital data on consumer behavior in China, a market that analysts predict will be one of the most open to switching to autonomous vehicles.This seismic market shift has traditional automakers scrambling to catch up to the drastically changing technology and consumer landscape.Volkswagen recently announced that it would focus more of its resources on self-driving and electric cars, while pumping $300 million into Israeli firm Gett.Not to be outdone, General Motors recently acquired Cruise Automation for $1 billion and invested an additional $500 million into Lyft.Add to this Chrysler teaming up with Google self-driving minivans and BMW’s refocusing its “i” division toward developing autonomous car technology.And with such huge players from both the IT world and the automaking universe gambling big, it’s clear there will be massive winners and losers as the technology shakes out. So strap in, it’s going to be one wild ride. Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and…center_img IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… Related Posts 5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle…last_img read more

first_imgThe Kentucky Supreme Court has found a portion of the Multichannel Video Programming and Communications Services Tax (the Telecom Tax) unconstitutional. Specifically, the court held that the legislature could not prohibit cities from collecting franchise fees  as consideration for the use of the cities’ rights-of-way.However, the court noted that the remainder of the Telecom Tax was still in effect even with the elimination of the prohibition provision. Severing the prohibition provision did not damage one of the intended purposes of the law—to prevent double payment by non-satellite program providers, according to the court. Additionally, the court noted that the tax credit provided in the Telecom Tax accomplished the legislature’s goal of alleviating the perceived inequity among various types of program providers that was created by federal legislation.Kentucky CATV Association v. City of Florence, Kentucky Supreme Court, No. 2015-SC-000178-DG, June 15, 2017 (available August 31, 2017), ¶203-173Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_imgA safe harbor is provided that allows taxpayers to treat certain infrastructure trades or businesses as electing real property trades or businesses not subject to the Code Sec. 163(j) business interest deduction limit. These include trades or businesses that are conducted in connection with the designing, building, managing, operating, or maintaining of certain core infrastructure projects for purposes of private activity bond financing proposals. If a taxpayer makes this election, the taxpayer must use the alternative depreciation system (ADS) to depreciate property. Taxpayers may apply the safe harbor to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.Rev. Proc. 2018-59IR-2018-233Proposed Regulations, NPRM REG-106089-18Other References:Code Sec. 163CCH Reference – ¶2018FED ¶9406N.10Tax Research ConsultantCCH Reference – TRC BUSEXP: 21,200Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

first_img MLK Day of Service at Philadelphia Museum of Art When: Monday, January 20  Where: The Philadelphia Museum of Art, 2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway Cost: Pay what you wish More info: Click here for more details.  This year, the Philadelphia Museum of Art will again serve as a workshop site for the Philly’s MLK Day of Service. Throughout the day workshops will be held for people of all ages, and The Camden Sophisticated Sisters Drill Team will bring down the house with an electrifying performance. Museum admission will be pay-what-you-wish in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.  MLK Day of Service(Courtesy of MLK Day of Service) Philly 360° MLK Day of Service Top Picks:  Martin Luther King Sharing the Heritage Celebration and Day of Service  When: Monday, January 21, 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.  Where: The African American Museum of Philadelphia, 701 Arch Street Cost: Free More Info: Click here for details.  AAMP celebrates MLK Day with a special day of workshops, performances and volunteer opportunities. Guests are invited to donate food for the ChAAMPs Against Hunger Philabundance Food Drive, engage in hands-on service projects, and explore the museum’s exhibits throughout the day. The celebrate also features special MLK inspired performances, including a break dance program at noon, and a show stopping appearane by the Universal African Dance and Drum Ensemble. Martin Luther King Weekend at Eastern State Penitentiary When: Saturday, January 18 – Monday, January 20 Where: Eastern State Penitentiary, 2027 Fairmount Avenue Cost: Free More info: www.easternstate.org Celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. with Eastern State Penitentiary’s annual MLK event. This weekend, visitors can watch professional actors read excerpts from Dr. King’s iconic writing, Letter From Birmingham Jail. Guests will also have a chance to read his letter on camera, as Art Sanctuary joins in the festivities with crafts and their initiative, Read With Me: The MLK Project.  World Changers: Here’s the perfect chance to give back to your community, and honor the legacy and life work of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. This Monday, January 20, thousands of volunteers will take to the streets of Philadelphia for one of the country’s largest service projects, The 19th Annual Greater Philadelphia MLK Day of Service. Want in on the MLK Day of Service action? Then make your way to Philly, and join in one of the many service projects in need of a few helping hands. From mural paintings, and park clean-ups to concerts and other MLK inspired performances, Philly will be buzzing with tons of activities geared toward making a brighter tomorrow for all.   Visit the MLK Day of Service website to register, and browse the full lists of projects and events. As always, we’ve pulled together a list of Philly 360° Top Picks to get you started. But first, grab a little MLK inspiration by watching this video produced by Art Sanctuary with over a dozen Philadelphia leaders, artists and everyday heroes reading Dr. King’s iconic “Letter from a Birmingham Jail.” Be sure to check out this MLK inspired video from Art Sanctuary, and our Philly 360° MLK Day of Service Top Picks!  MLK Day Celebration at The Franklin Institute  When: Monday, January 21 Where: The Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th Street  Cost: $16.50 adults, $14 children  More Info: Click here for full details.  Participate in a Science Scavenger Hunt and discover the amazing breakthroughs made by famous African American scientists. Young guest will have the opportunity to make a colorful and inspirational dreamcatcher, and  Dr. King’s powerful “I Have Dream” speech will be broadcast once an hour at the Benjamin Franklin National Memorial.  A King’s Celebration When: Monday, January 20, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.  Where: Martin Luther King Recreation Center, 2101 W. Cecil B. Moore Avenue  Cost: Free  More Info: Click here for details.  Presented by The City of Philadelphia’s Philly Rising initiative, this daylong celebration will include a youth basketball tournament, the installation of a new mural in the center’s gymnasium, a concert performance, and a series of inspirational speakers throughout the day.last_img read more

first_img Red Bull BC One Cypher Philadelphia When: Saturday, May 31, doors open at 3PM Where: The Skybox Event Center/2424 Studios, 2424 E. York Street More Info: Click here for details. Watch this video of Philly breaker Knuckles taking home the title for last year’s Red Bull BC One Cypher in Philly. It’s going down! For over a decade, the Red Bull One Cypher has showcased the international reach of breaking/B-boying, an art form that has evolved incredibly since its inner-city beginnings during the late 1970s. On Saturday, May 31, the best B-Boys from across the northeast will face off for the Red Bull BC One Philadelphia Cypher at The Skybox. These 16 hand-selected breakers are sure to bring the ruckus, demonstrating their amazing power, agility and creativity in one-on-one break battles. The competitor with the best artistic skills, choreography, innovation and character will be named winner of the Philadelphia Cypher and will qualify for a spot in the Red Bull BC One North American Final in Las Vegas on August 15. There, the winner will then compete to enter into the international Red Bull BC One World Finals against the best breakers in the world. This long-running annual competition has seen great talents since it’s start in 2004, and this year is no different. There will be breakers representing crews from 7 different states, including Philly’s own Box Won, Mighty Mouse, Napalm, and Ookie. Check it out!  Here’s the full list of the B-boys competeing. (Of course we’re cheering extra hard for our hometown breakers.)  Mighty Mouse – Repstyles – PhiladelphiaNapalm – Beatwakz – PhiladelphiaOokie – The Clique – PhiladelphiaBox Won – Illadelph Phlave – Philadelphia Atlas – True Agressions Crew- New Jersey Bombi – Lawtown Assassins – Massachusetts Diego – Breakfresh – New York City JuManji – Floor Obsessions – New York City Kid Glyde – Dynamic Rockers – New York City Lil Tony – Infamous Zebra Mob – New Jersey Pete Nasty – Staggered Stepz – Rochester Soapy – Lionz of Zion – Maryland Tiger – United Outkast – Connecticut Tony T-Bags – Del Fuego Wolf Pac – Boston Uncle Will – X-Fenz – New York City Whorah – Beast Coast – New York City Red Bull BC One Cypher 2013 – Philadelphia(Courtesy of Red Bull)last_img read more

first_imgRoad crews are out again in Columbia and other parts of mid-Missouri, working to clear away some historic snowfall.Columbia Regional Airport picked up a record for Nov. 11 of 1.1″. Three-to-four inches fell in town.The Highway Patrol alone reported 118 crashes in mid-Missouri’s Troop F. Ten people were hurt.The National Weather Service reports we hit 7 degrees on Tuesday morning. That breaks the record low for Nov. 12 of 9 degrees set in 1911.Columbia Public Schools and dozens of other districts decided to either start late Tuesday or cancel classes. See that list here.(This story was last updated at 8:12 a.m. Tuesday.)last_img read more

first_imgAfter a longer wait than I planned here are the key screens that your end users may see if they click on the Icon in the Centrino 2 Platform with Intel vPro Technology. They show the different tabs and the difference between Unprovisioned & Provisioned. What’s next.. Testing them in the lab and sharing those video’s out.. stay tuned for more.last_img

first_imgIt has been a couple weeks now and just in case anyone may have forgotten, Nehalem rocks.  In my job I talk to customers every day and even though I have become a bit jaded by the numbers associated with the new Xeon 5500 series processors, customers constantly remind me just how significant this change is.  The leap in performance is unprecedented in the history of the “Xeon” family.  The opportunity that this creates for businesses is tremendous.  Chris has blogged a lot about the economics of refresh and anyone who is not paying attention has a job that is just too cushy.  For the rest of you that actually worry about performance, data center power capacity, data center space, etc – please pay attention.Data center space is for many businesses the single most expensive “office” space they own. Consider this coupled with the reality that demand for computing continues to grow, and 81% of businesses report line of site to data center capacity ( power or space ) overflow.Any data center owner who is facing capacity challenges and not aggressively refreshing and consolidating should be “made redundant”.  (opinion)some very very round numbers to consider:If you have servers that are 4 or 5 years old, the new Xeon 5500 series processor based servers can be as much as 10 times faster.Those old servers ( if they are typical enterprise servers ) are setting at about 10% utilization.When you refresh and consolidate you are going to virtualize – so now, lets do the simple back of napkin math on the opportunity :you have 1000 servers that are at 10% utilization.with virtualization you could boost up to 50% utilization – 5 to 1 consolidation – now you have 200 serversthe new servers are 10 times faster – so with an aggressive refresh – now you have 20 serversDemand is not going away, and eventually you will fill up all this new capacity and of course in the real world this isn’t all going to happen day one,BUT, anyone complaining of capacity issues AND using old hardware, must not be paying attention.  Please wake them up.last_img read more

first_img*Ian Thomas is a persona by Second City for Intel Hello everyone!Welcome to my new video blog (not a vlog, what kind of word is that anyways?)I’ll* have a few episodes on my thoughts about IT in the coming few weeks, including as I prepare to head to the Intel Developer’s Forum 2010 in San Fransisco this year.Feel free to say hello! I’ll be bringing my camera with me to IDF – let me know what you’d like to see!last_img

first_imgPUE has been a hugely successful efficiency metric in quantifying the discussion of data center infrastructure efficiency. Of course, infrastructure is not the only thing in a data center, and we have proposed “SUE” as “Part B” of the data center efficiency equation to address the important aspect of compute efficiency. SUE is a similarly derived IT performance metric which is gaining traction in application.Though neither metric is “perfect,” both have a low barrier for adoption and are meaningful in a big picture perspective (so long as you don’t get too hung up on tricking the metric at the expense of other important parameters). Another powerful aspect driving acceptance of PUE and SUE is they fit easily into grammatical sentences. If your PUE is 2.0 you’re using twice the energy you need to support your current IT infrastructure. If your SUE is 2.0 you’re operating twice the number of servers you need to support you current IT workload. Both convey obvious business impact.So what about the “holy grail,” data center work-efficiency?There’s broad industry recognition (as Ian Bitterlin says, “it is the 1.0 that is consuming 70% of the power”), and a lot of work is going on to understand it. For instance, The Green Grid published the DCeE or a Data Center Efficiency Metric back in 2010, based on a view toward quantifying “useful” work output of the data center.However, this sophisticated approach really has to do with application-level details and has not yet gained wide industry traction. This is partly, I believe, because of its complexity; the barrier to entry is an investment in highly granular data analysis which is more than many operators need or will support.So I asked myself, “what are the alternatives?” Can we lower the barrier to entry in the way PUE and SUE have done for infrastructure and IT efficiency and define a Data Center Capital Usage Effectiveness (DCUE) taken as the ratio of two quantities with units of “Work/Energy?”Well, the short answer is, we can. The starting point is the very simple idea that:Work/Energy = Integrated (Server Performance * Utilization)/(Total Data Center Energy)The big assumptions are: 1) it assumes statistical independence of server performance and utilization, 2) it tacitly assumes CPU performance and utilization drive work output (though this simplifying assumption can be removed with more complexity), and 3) it neglects things like network and storage efficiency (which are minority energy consumers in most data centers). Not perfect, but tractable.The DCUE formula has the advantage of providing an easy entrée into the analysis of the work efficiency of the data center; it focuses on what many consider the big three: Infrastructure efficiency, IT equipment efficiency, and it quantifies how effectively the capital asset is being utilized (thanks to Jon Koomey for pointing that out to me).Roughly, here is how the numbers work (these are made up data but are representative based on experience): Imagine a typical data center with a PUE of 2.0. If the data center is on a refresh cycle of six years its SUE will be about 2.4, and the server utilization might be about 20% in an enterprise with a low level of virtualization.An efficient data center might have a PUE closer to 1.3, a more aggressive three year server refresh rate with an SUE of about 1.6, and might increase utilization to 50% with both higher rates of virtualization and perhaps utilize technology like “Cloud Bursting” to handle demand-peaks.The math reveals a Data Center Capital Usage Effectiveness (DCUE) opportunity of about 6 times between the two scenarios. “Efficient” In fact, a“Cloud” DCUE could even be higher with more aggressive server refresh, lower PUE, and higher utilization levels, whereas typical enterprise utilizations might be lower.My friend Mike Patterson here at Intel is always challenging, “so… what does it mean?” Well just as PUE and SUE represent “excess” quantities, a DCUE of 24 means you are using about 24 X the energy (and hence data center capital) as you’d need at optimum efficiency. That means 24 times the data center capital. A pretty powerful argument to improve.So there you have it, “The Big Three” for data center capital efficiency: 1. How efficient if your infrastructure? 2. How effective is your server compute capability? and 3. what is the utilization of your capital assets?In subsequent blogs, I’ll talk more about these ideas and some of the issues we still need to think about. But until then, I’m curious what you think. Right track? Wrong track? Why? 4 2.0 50% “Typical” SUE 2.4 PUE 24 Data Center 1.3 20% 1.6 DCUE Utilizationlast_img read more

first_imgThe All-in-One PC consumed 55 percent fewer average watts while idle and 53 percent fewer average watts under load than did the legacy desktop tower.The Mini consumed 60 percent fewer average watts while idle and 59 percent fewer average watts under load than did the legacy desktop tower.Now, turn those savings into money, and it’s easy to see how new systems can prove a boon to your bottom line. Just consider this: The study reported that a business that replaces 10,000 legacy desktop towers with 10,000 new mini desktops can save $8.88 per employee every year. That adds up to a total cost savings of up to $355,200 in power costs.1 We might be talking mini desktops, but those aren’t mini savings. Something to think about.There’s a lot more to come in this desktop series on PC refresh, so make sure to come back. Next up is Part 3, in which we’ll take a look at how new PCs can help make IT more effective. In the meantime, take a look at the complete version of the study cited above online, and feel free to join the conversation using #IntelDesktop.This is the second and most recent installment of the “Change Your Desktops, Change Your Business” series in the Desktop World Tech Innovation Series. To view the other posts in the series, click here: Desktop World Series.1. Based on a conservative estimate of one hour under load and seven hours idle for average power consumption per employee per day, 46-week work year per employee, and average U.S. commercial power costs of $0.1075 per kilowatt-hour from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (www.eia.gov/electricity/monthly/pdf/epm.pdf) Efficiency. We talk about it all the time these days, but are we really doing everything we can to achieve it? In my first post in this PC refresh series, we discussed how updating your aging PCs to newer systems can help your employees become more efficient and productive.But efficiency has another facet as well that we should consider, and that has to do with how much energy and money we are unwittingly wasting every month by using those same aging PCs. The truth is, if you’re using older desktop PCs, the watts and dollars can really add up. That can translate into big money you could be putting toward your business (I’ll get to how much in a second).According to the same report I cited in my previous post, both All-in-One PCs and Mini PCs consume significantly less power than your older desktop tower. In fact, and this is what really struck me, not only did they use less power than older systems, they used less power even when they were “under load” and the older systems were idle. How much less? Here’s what the study found:last_img read more

first_imgDC P3700 Series – SSDPE2MD400G44002.5”All Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier Model – Part NumberCapacity (GB)Form FactorTier DC P3700 Series – SSDPEDMD800G4800HHHL AICAll Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3700 Series – SSDPEDMD400G4400HHHL AICAll Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPE2ME020T420002.5”Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3700 Series – SSDPEDMD016T41600HHHL AICHybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPE2ME800G48002.5”All Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier Latency, Cost, and Data Center Footprint ComparisonWe can also see that there is a 10x reduction in overall datacenter footprint and the overall latency is within 3% of an all-flash SAN.Latest version of Virtual SAN supports up to 64 hosts per cluster and each cluster can have up to 6,400 VMs. Intel had the opportunity to build world’s first 64 node all flash Virtual SAN with NVMe SSDs cluster highlighting the ability to run millions of IOPs with very low latency. We recently showcased it at VMworld Europe ’15 in October.With Intel Optane SSD offering IO wait below 10 microseconds recently demoed in Oracle Open World coming soon I see a very exciting future with Virtual SAN and Intel SSDs! DC P3600 Series – SSDPEDME012T41200HHHL AICAll Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPEDME800G4800HHHL AICAll Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3700 Series – SSDPE2MD800G48002.5”All Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPEDME020T42000HHHL AICHybrid Caching Tiercenter_img Imagine bringing the world’s first NVMe SSDs support for VMware Virtual SAN to datacenters around the world! That’s what we have now done – OFFICIAL support of Intel’s NVMe SSDs on VMware’s Virtual SAN. Now that’s some great news for IT administrators around the world looking to implement NVMe SSDs on Virtual SAN!VMWare certified Intel NVMe SSDs on Virtual SAN HCL: DCP3700 Series – SSDPE2MD016T416002.5”Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPEDME016T41600HHHL AICHybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPE2ME016T416002.5”Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPE2ME400G44002.5”All Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier DCP3700 Series – SSDPEDMD020T42000HHHL AICHybrid Caching Tier DCP3700 Series – SSDPE2MD020T420002.5”Hybrid Caching Tier DC P3600 Series – SSDPE2ME012T412002.5”All Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tier Virtual SAN provides us the ability create all-flash architecture, where we can tire NVMe SSD’s for different needs. This allows high endurance caching tier for writes and read-intensive, cost effective capacity tier for data persistence resulting in excellent ROI on an all-flash architecture. There have been questions from few IT vendors on why should I be updating my infrastructure to all flash architecture along with NVMe. My answer has been simple: extremely low latency, endurance, performance and overall lower TCO along with Virtual SAN’s ability to scale when needed approach without disruption and with its simplicity of overall storage management help IT vendors to implement Virtual SAN for applications that are critical, require faster response time.Applications running on virtualized environment like Virtual SAN are highly storage dependent for effective performance. Let’s take any database application as an example, when the application is running on a VM it makes large number of requests to the storage through compute and if the storage is built on HDDs it ends up acting as a bottleneck to the application’s performance given that HDDs latency are in milliseconds. Replacing HDDs with NVMe SSDs tremendously increases the application’s performance since latency to complete the requests are in terms of microseconds now,that’s a huge difference! In an all Virtual SAN flash architecture there is no tiering of SSDs with HDDs instead SSDs are used on both caching and capacity tiers giving a consistent performance for both read and write operations there by proving the end user an overall faster application to work with.With NVMe SSDs you get higher IOPs performance this along with lower latency provides Virtual SAN the ability to increase user workload thereby increasing the overall VM density with minimal hardware resulting in lower TCO.  Virtual SAN’s ability to scale out without disruption when the organization’s workload increases along with low power NVMe SSDs help IT vendors to have smaller datacenter footprint with lower power consumption.Recently my colleague worked on a case study with the largest grocery retailer in the U.S Kroger Co. on an all flash VSAN architecture with Intel® SSD Data Center Family for NVMe. Based on the case study the charts below illustrates the overall IOPS, latency cost, and data center footprint comparison between FC Hybrid, FC flash SAN and VSAN. From the chart we can clearly see that all flash VSAN has an 8% IOPs performance increase with ~1/5 of the expense when compared to all flash FC SAN array.IOPS, Cost, and Data Center Footprint Comparison DC P3600 Series – SSDPEDME400G4400HHHL AICAll Flash Caching Tier, Hybrid Caching Tierlast_img read more

first_imgAccording to leading experts, four out of five restaurant operators agree that technology increases sales, boosts productivity, and gives their establishment a competitive edge. That’s a major opportunity, and Intel is excited to partner with Ziosk to bring the latest in hospitality technology to 2017’s National Restaurant Association Show.The show is the largest gathering of the food and hospitality industry, featuring the latest developments in food and food technology, as well as other innovations. Focuses this year will be on developing positive workplaces, and there will be a suite of hands-on educational sessions designed to improve productivity and efficiency. The signature event will feature a roundtable of industry leaders, including Jason Dorsey, Dan Park, and Dawn Sweeney on how to get ahead of the curve. We’ll be there in full force, enjoying the show, and presenting new tech.The Latest Upgrade for HospitalityZiosk pay-at-table and mobile payment solutions have served 1.25 billion people worldwide; they’ve processed $20 billion in transactions, and will process billions more. Intel’s partnership means these solutions are fueled by the latest computing technology, featuring our Atom processorsOpens in a new window for more powerful and robust performance. New upgrades ultimately benefit the end-user experience, providing seamless “pay and go” options that allow customers to leave when they like, streamlining restaurant operations. After customers leave feedback, it becomes immediately available to restaurant operators, with additional customer data giving insight into menu and drink options. Most importantly, pay-at-table solutions allow servers to give more time and attention to customers, instead of focusing on handling the check.Tech Partners and ResultsZiosk has partnered with some of the biggest names in hospitality already, including Chili’s, Olive Garden, Red Robin, TGI Friday’s, Outback, and Friendly’s. When customers are in a restaurant featuring Ziosk technology, more than 80 percent of credit and debit card users will use the terminals, improving the pace of table turns by six to nine minutes. There are also total increases in customer surveys filled out, and major increases in eClub and loyalty program enrollment.Intel is proud to have our technology serving and improving the bottom line for hospitality, and we’re excited that our Atom processors keep business humming. If you’d like to find out more, check out the product launch at NRA Show 2017, or learn more on our solutions pageOpens in a new window.last_img read more

first_imgShould NASA have anything to with studying Earth? NASA Administrator Charles Bolden found himself having to explain that to lawmakers yesterday at a hearing by the House of Representatives on NASA’s $18.7 billion budget request for 2012. Ironically, he testified only hours before a NASA mission to help understand climate change crashed into the Pacific after a rocket failure.NASA wants $1.8 billion for earth science in next year’s budget, up 25% from current spending levels. Among other things, the agency plans to use that money to ready the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 for launch in 2013 and to begin the development of two missions to measure soil moisture and monitor ice sheets and forest cover. The chairman of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies, Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA), asked Bolden if NASA wouldn’t be better off letting agencies—in particular, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the U.S. Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation—take over NASA’s earth science efforts. Perhaps that would free up money for NASA to pursue space exploration, Wolf suggested. He also asked whether there was any overlap between the work being done by NOAA and NASA in monitoring Earth. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)”Everything we do in earth science is unique to NASA,” Bolden replied, emphasizing that looking down on Earth from space to understand our planet better was very much a part of NASA’s job. And shifting NASA’s earth science programs to other agencies would amount to getting rid of them entirely, he said. He pointed out that a 2009 study by the U.S. Government Accountability Office had found no duplication of efforts between NASA and NOAA.At the hearing, Bolden also had to field charges of fiscal mismanagement at NASA. Committee member Kevin Yoder (R-KS), one of several new Republican members in Congress who are advocating large cuts in government spending, pointed to the $1.6 billion cost overruns in the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) as an example. Bolden’s response was apologetic. “Nobody was as angry as I was when we discovered where JWST was,” Bolden said, referring to the independent review that revealed JWST’s troubles in November. He added that the management structure for the JWST project had been changed as a result of the findings. The lesson learned from JWST, Bolden said, was that “the worst person” to ask about a project’s cost estimate is “the program manager or principal investigator” of the project. Bolden assured Yoder and the rest of the committee that all future projects and missions would undergo independent assessment of cost.Earlier, Bolden defended the agency’s decision to request $850 million in the 2012 budget for the development of commercial rockets that NASA will rely on to get cargo and astronauts to the international space station. NASA’s plan to use commercial spacecraft for some of its missions has been the biggest source of controversy in the Administration’s new space policy, and the request is about $300 million greater than the level set by the NASA authorization approved by Congress last year. Bolden explained to lawmakers that the additional funding level was necessary because “providing safe access” to the space station is the highest priority for NASA. The agency expects that it will be able to hire the services of commercial launchers by 2016. Until then, the agency is dependent on the Russian launch vehicle Soyuz. See our 2012 Budget coverage.last_img read more

first_img NIH Reacting to a steep rise in the number of young biomedical scientists seeking scarce academic jobs, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) plans to launch programs to prepare scientists for nonacademic careers, move students through their Ph.D.s faster, and bolster the pay of postdocs. NIH officials announced these plans yesterday at a meeting of NIH’s Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD). It is a response to a report in June on the U.S. biomedical workforce co-chaired by Princeton University President Shirley Tilghman, who believes NIH is training too many young scientists in a system that she calls “dysfunctional.” The report itself did not recommend imposing any ceiling on graduate training, however, and report co-chair Sally Rockey, NIH deputy director for extramural research, said yesterday that “we did not say we should reduce the numbers” of scientists being trained because that would require a modeling study. But NIH agrees that training needs to be improved, she noted. Toward that end, Rockey said NIH is planning to take the following steps: Launch a grants program for institutions to develop “innovative approaches” to complement traditional research training, for example, by preparing young scientists for careers in industry or science policy. NIH expects to fund up to 50 grants over the next 2 years in what Rockey called the “centerpiece” of NIH’s efforts. Require that every graduate student and postdoc supported by NIH work with their adviser on setting career goals through what is known as an Individual Development Plan. “We have to change the culture” so that investigators “are invested in the positive outcomes of their trainees,” Rockey said. “Encourage” institutions to limit NIH support for graduate students to 5 years, with exceptions for family leave or if a mentor dies. Raise the starting postdoc stipend from $39,000 to $42,000 as soon as next year, and examine whether NIH needs a policy to improve postdoc benefits. Increase funding for two types of grants aimed at giving young investigators independent labs quickly: “kangaroo” (K99/R00) grants that combine postdoctoral support with a research grant; and Early Independence Awards, which allow newly minted Ph.D.s to skip the postdoc and start their own lab. Create a system to track the careers of all trainees, not just those on training grants. Graduate students will receive a unique NIH identification number now assigned only to investigators and postdocs. NIH will also “encourage” institutions to post online reports on the career outcomes of their trainees. The one recommendation from June that NIH is not following is to shift some graduate and postdocs from research grants to training and fellowship grants, which offer a higher-quality experience. That would have been “extraordinarily complicated to do,” Rockey said, partly because training and research are separate lines in NIH’s budget and also because almost seven times as many postdocs are on research grants. However, Rockey says the steps that NIH is taking will accomplish the same goals. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Tilghman, who chaired a 1998 report that said the United States is training too many biomedical scientists, praised NIH’s response to the June report: “This is the most attention manpower issues have received at NIH in my career,” she told ScienceInsider. But she also told the advisory committee about her “cynicism” that institutions will fail to post the career outcomes of trainees on the Web and limit NIH support to 5 years because NIH is not requiring those steps. “Without the financial pressure to get people through in an expeditious length of time, I think we will be looking at data that looks just like this 10 years from now,” she told the ACD panel. NIH Director Francis Collins acknowledged Tilghman’s concern that the plan lacks “real teeth.” He and Rockey suggested that it may not be legally possible for the agency to force institutions to track down past graduate students. But it may be possible to make that a requirement for new trainees, he and Rockey said. Sally Rockey, NIH deputy director for extramural researchlast_img read more