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first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! The missing link: Researchers report having discovered the only surviving member of the Senate who has yet to form a 2008 presidential exploratory committee. The senator, only identified as John Doe ’08 to protect his identity, is said to be missing the DNA found in most other politicians. “It’s the central factor determining egocentricity, or what we in politics call the `look at me, aren’t I hot?’ gene,” said one political scientist. “We think the absence of the gene that every politician is born with has something to do with years of political climate change. How he ever got elected to the Senate in the first place is still a mystery, but he may be the last of his kind.” A convenient second chance: Al Gore’s documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth,” has garnered two Oscar nominations. “It’s a total surprise that Hollywood would find my film award worthy,” said the 2000 presidential candidate in thanking the Academy for the opportunity. “Finally I can use that acceptance speech I’ve had ready for the last six years.” Candidate virus: With an unexpected glut of politicians announcing their plans to form presidential exploratory committees from their Web sites, Internet search engines across the world slowed to a crawl last week. To combat the Web overload, YouTube has announced the creation of a new site – YouPrez.com – where candidates can announce their intentions without shutting down the Net. “We expect it to be our second most trafficked politicians’ site,” said YouTube gazzillionaire, Rich Andricher. “Right after to YouGoin2Prison.com.” Confused, but honest candidate: Democratic candidate Dennis Kucinich, D-Ohio, has defended his campaign slogan – “I’m the only white male running” – saying that he is not a racist as much as a truth-teller. “All I’m saying is that truth is more important than color or sex,” said the used congressman. But can we still spank politicians? If state Assemblywoman Sally Lieber, D-Mountain View, has anything to say about it, spanking your own child in California will soon be against the law. Her proposed bill does, however, allow for an exception called the “Hey, you two! You stay on your side and you stay on yours, or I will pull this car over to the side of the road and beat the &*$@ out of both of you” clause. Bad taste: Despite protests from fans, the late Jimi Hendrix’s image will be used on a new caffeine drink. While it’s not unusual for rock ‘n’ roll legends lending their music to products and commercials, this one is setting a bad precedent, as the company will be rolling out additional products including Mama Cass Sandwich Spreads and Big Bopper Airlines. Tasty: Leonardo DiCaprio admitted wanting to give up acting for a time after starring in the hit movie “Titanic,” because he was being considered a “another piece of cute meat” after the film’s extraordinary success. “I’m no piece of cute meat,” said the hunky piece of adorable beefcake. “Oh, sure, the money, worldwide attention and power to control the rest of my career was – wait a minute – someone please shut me up before I blow a good thing.” What a sport: The pregnant wife of a rabid Chicago Bears fan chose to have her baby induced the day before the NFC Championship game so her husband wouldn’t have to miss the game. The good news was that the fan was able to see the Bears win. The bad news is that his wife wasn’t due for seven months. SurgeTV: While most high-definition televisions transmits crystal-clear images, the White House is developing a new, even higher definition TV, which promises to broadcast a picture better than real life. “With the deluge of negative news coming out of Iraq, we felt it necessary to give Americans better images to gauge our success,” said presidential spokesman Tony Snow. “It’s kind of like how advertising works. It’s not only a war, it’s a war that can grow hair on a golf ball.” Now where can the over-40 crowd get sick? Magic Mountain has announced the closing down of Psyclone, the amusement park’s oldest roller coaster, believing visitors want more than just tummy-turning nausea. “Throwing up is just so pass?,” said a Magic Mountain spokesperson. “Kids today want rides where they could die.” Steve Young is author of “Great Failures of the Extremely Successful” (www.greatfailure.com).last_img

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call (661) 948-5279. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700.Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200. or check www.todayna.org. THURSDAY Ask and It is Given classes, 6:30-8 p.m., Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. High Desert Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at 1008 W. Ave. M-4, Palmdale. Call (661) 992-3229 or 944-1130. High Desert Modular Model Railroad Club meets, 7 p.m. the second Thursday of each month in the Experimental Test Pilots Association boardroom, 44814 Elm Ave., Lancaster. Call Bob Drury at (661) 400-4479. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Cedar Open Reading meets weekly, 7-9 p.m. in Cedar Hall, 44851 Cedar Ave., Lancaster, except on the second Thursday of the month when the meeting is in the gallery, 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4314. The Overcomers, an emotional and educational support group for mental health consumers, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call Bill Slocum or Mary Rogers at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Aces & Deuces Square Dance Club will meet, 7-8:15 p.m. for beginners and 8:15-9:30 p.m. for plus at Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale, for ages 10 and up. Cost: $3. Call (661) 256-7650. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Facilitated Anger Management Group for teens will meet, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults will meet, 6:30-8 p.m., at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Al-Anon will host a discussion, 1 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale; a step study at 7 p.m. at 1827 E. Ave. Q-10, Palmdale; and a meeting on Steps, Traditions, Concepts at 7:30 p.m. at 44815 Fig Ave., Suite 101, Lancaster. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. Information and location: (661) 723-9967. Desert Aire Women’s Golf Association will meet at Desert Aire Golf Course at Avenue P and 40th Street East in Palmdale. Call (661) 269-5982. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Country line dance lessons for seniors, 1-2 p.m. for beginners and 2:15 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Donation requested. Call (661) 267-5551. Soroptimist International of Antelope Valley will meet, noon at the Holiday Inn of Palmdale-Lancaster, 38630 5th St. W., Palmdale. Business and professional women are invited. Call (661) 946-1609. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7:30-9 p.m. Step Workbook reading and writing. Call (661) 947-7935. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Support group for women in abusive or battering situations will meet, 1-3:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A Spanish-language group also will meet, 10 a.m.-noon. Call (661) 945-6736 or (661) 945-5509. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. FRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission: $3 for club members, $4 for nonmembers. Dance lessons: $2. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Swingtime will host swing, waltz, ballroom and salsa dancing, 7-10 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $3. Call (661) 400-3166. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with anxieties, panic attacks, depression and fears, will meet, 2 p.m. at Los Angeles County Mental Health offices, 349A E. Ave. K-6, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3956. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at A Place in the Sun church, 38117 13th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9180. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call the Rev. Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil-painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club hosts dinner, 7 p.m. at Greenhouse Cafe, 1169 Commerce Center Way, Lancaster. For reservations call (661) 267-2586 by Thursday. Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of each month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 949-9467. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5; students with ID admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults ages 17 to 25 with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Dance Groove will offer ballroom and Latin dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at Dance Groove Studio, 43631 10th St. W., Lancaster. Cost: $5 per person. Call (661) 948-9101. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12-Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo, 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Early-bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or log on to the Web site at www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club weekly league bowling, 6-8 p.m. at Sands Bowl, 43323 Sierra Highway, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Information and location: Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Business Network International B2 Bombers chapter will meet, 12:15 p.m. at Eduardo’s restaurant, 819 W. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 609-1288 or e-mail audmill@qnet.com. The organization’s Web site is at www.bni-scav.com. Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call MiikMiller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miikcq Miller at (661) 256-0328. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12-Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551.Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551.Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club hosts a games snack night, 7 p.m. in Lancaster. Bring food to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or 946-5222. Emotional Freedom Technique for pain relief weekly demonstrations, 6:30-7:30 p.m. (except before three-day weekends), Stress Management Institute for Living Empowered, 44130 Division St., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-4220. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. last_img read more

first_img1 Chelsea are considering a late £15million offer for Fernando Lllorente with the Swansea City striker reportedly eager to reunite with his former manager at Juventus, Antonio Conte.The Telegraph report that Paul Clement is braced for a bid from the defending Premier League champions before the close of the transfer window, and the player himself is aware of their interest.Conte was keen to sign the Spaniard in January, but with a relegation battle to fight, the Swans were unwilling to let their leading forward leave.Wilfried Bony, however, is closing in on a return to the Liberty Stadium, which would soften the blow if Llorente decides he now wants a move to Stamford Bridge.The 32-year-old is yet to make an appearance for Swansea this season having suffered a broken arm in a cycling accident back in July, and will miss the game against Crystal Palace later this afternoon. Fernando Llorente, the Swansea striker last_img read more

first_imgChelsea are expected to field offers from Real Madrid for goalkeeper Thibaut Courtois this summer, and a report has named the player who could replace the Belgian at Stamford Bridge.The Sun say Joe Hart is being considered by the Blues should Courtois decide to join Real, as Manchester City are willing to sell the England keeper when his loan to West Ham ends at the end of 2017-18.Courtois has a contract that expires at the end of next season, and he has yet to agree to new terms to extend his stay at Stamford Bridge.Chelsea are willing to pay Courtois around £200,000-a-week to keep the 25-year-old in west London, though there is a belief he wants to return to Madrid if Real come calling.Courtois spent three years with Real’s local rivals Atletico, and his family – including two young children – still live in Spain’s capital. He has admitted he could reject a new Chelsea contract due to personal reasons, regardless of the deal offered to him by the Blues.Should Courtois depart this summer, a move for Hart will be considered.The England international, 30, will be allowed to leave Man City having spent the last two seasons away from the Etihad on loan deals.He played for Torino in 2016-17 before joining West Ham at the start of this campaign, though he has lost his place in the team since David Moyes’ appointment as manager; Moyes prefers Adrian as his No.1. Joe Hart is being lined up to replace Thibaut Courtois at Chelsea 1last_img read more

first_imgMost Americans pay taxes when they take a spouse along on a business trip at company expense. Not Congress. That’s because some Southland lawmakers and others say a variety of factors make them exempt – including that their spouses are akin to the first lady and perform vital ceremonial functions on every trip. But tax attorneys and experts say the tax code is clear: Politicians should be paying the same taxes as everyone else. And Public Citizen, a D.C.-based taxpayer watchdog group, now has filed a complaint with the Internal Revenue Service calling for an investigation into lawmakers’ exemption claims and challenging Congress to pay back taxes on millions of dollars of privately funded travel. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’“They just assumed that they are not subject to the same taxes as the rest of us,” said Craig Holman, legislative representative for the group. “There appears to be a presumption among members of Congress that certain laws don’t apply to them like they apply to the rest of us. “The rest of the world, we all know this is a tax obligation.” The IRS declined to comment last week on Public Citizen’s complaint and would not confirm whether an investigation is under way. But questions over lawmakers’ tax obligations, first reported by the Detroit News, have even prompted some members of Congress to ask the IRS to weigh in. For Southland lawmakers, public records show 13 of the 17 have taken relatives on privately funded trips since 2000, at a total cost of about $440,000. They range from Aspen Institute conferences in Venice, Helsinki and the Grand Cayman Islands to fact-finding missions paid for by Airbus to France and foreign trade groups to Istanbul and Qatar. House ethics rules say such travel is permissible, allowing a spouse or one dependent to accompany a lawmaker and accept transportation and other expenses. The ethics guidelines say nothing, however, about the payment of taxes on spouses’ free trips. Gene Smith, spokeswoman for Rep. Howard Berman, D-Van Nuys, the top Democrat on the House Ethics Committee, said that’s because tax issues rest with the IRS. She said the understanding that Berman and many other lawmakers have is that their spouses are exempt from declaring free travel as income. “Just as the president is accompanied by Mrs. Bush, members of Congress are frequently accompanied by their spouses who, like Laura Bush, play an official role. To my knowledge, there has been no ruling by the IRS on this subject,” she said. Berman is among the Southland’s top travelers, having taken 22 trips with his wife, Janis, and four with his daughter Lindsey since 2000. Rep. Howard “Buck” McKeon has traveled six times with his wife, Patricia, since 2000. McKeon also believes there is no requirement to pay taxes on the travel. “We have gotten guidance from Ethics that we don’t have to,” said McKeon spokesman James Geoffrey. “As far as we know, it was never required. We certainly wouldn’t have an objection if it were required.” Thomas Pfeifer, spokesman for Rep. Elton Gallegly – who last traveled with his wife to Croatia and Turkey in 2004 – said the congressman follows all IRS guidelines but believes declaring spousal travel is not law. Critics, however, say there are flaws in some lawmakers’ reasoning, including that the travel should be exempt because the spouses act as “first ladies.” Holman and others noted the first lady of the United States is considered a de-facto federal employee with a staff, a title and a budget. “She is a representative of the U.S. government. There is a reason why it’s a first lady rather than the first 535 ladies,” he said. Tax attorneys also noted that Congress wrote explicit laws on travel deductions. Under those, a spouse can deduct third-party travel if he or she is also an employee; would otherwise be able to write off the trip; or has a “bona fide” business purpose for being on the trip. “Congress has made this very, very clear. There is no explicit exemption for the first lady on the code either,” said Ted Seto, a tax law professor at Loyola University. “I would be more sympathetic to Congress’ arguments on this if they hadn’t been so specific on the tax law for ordinary human beings,” he said. Patrick McGinnis, a Los Angeles tax attorney who previously served as district counsel for the IRS, as well as others said lawmakers’ spouses may indeed have served a key business function on some or all of the trips. But like anyone else who claims a travel deduction, they would need to document and prove it. But even if documentation is provided, said UCLA tax law professor Steven Bank, the lawmaker should only be able to write off the percentage of the trip during which the spouse provided a business function. If a spouse, for example, attended a morning meeting but played golf for the rest of the day, only a portion of the trip could be deductible. Moreover, where foreign travel is concerned, a spouse’s business function must be more than 25 percent of the travel, or no deduction is allowed at all. Rep. Linda Sanchez, D-Lakewood, who last traveled with her ex-husband, Mark, in 2004 to India and Cuba, issued a statement through her spokesman that she follows all tax laws, but declined to specifically discuss spousal travel. Rep. Xavier Becerra, D-Los Angeles, who has traveled with his wife, Caroline, to Puerto Rico and Puerto Vallarta, issued a similar statement. Rep. Grace Napolitano, D-Santa Fe Springs, who attended a retreat in Puerto Rico and a meeting in New York in 2000 with her husband, Frank, said she gives her accounting firm all of her paperwork, including items from all congressional and privately funded trips. “I assume they’re reporting everything I give them that the feel is reportable,” she said. “If it’s something we need to look into then I say yes, let’s look at it.” Reps. Henry Waxman, D-Los Angeles, Adam Schiff, D-Pasadena, and Juanita Millender-McDonald did not return requests for comment. Waxman took 19 trips with his wife, Janet, since 2000; Schiff accepted four with his wife, Eve; and Millender- McDonald took two with her husband, James. Among lawmakers, only Rep. Brad Sherman, D-Sherman Oaks, a certified public accountant, agreed with tax experts that lawmakers’ spouses must prove their business role on trips if they want to write off the expense. Sherman, who rarely travels and has not taken any trips with a family member, said he does think the IRS should issue clear standards. “Very little guidance is given here,” Sherman said. “I’d like to get guidance from the IRS.” Until then, he said each trip should be treated under the tax code case by case. lisa.friedman@langnews.com (202) 662-8731160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! 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first_imgMiriam Ibarra, 30, a resident of one of Laurel Avenue’s apartment buildings, said she’s noticed a stronger police presence over the past year. “There has been consistently more police circling through here,” Ibarra said. “And they clean off the graffiti really quick now. I do feel a lot safer knowing they’re around.” Better coordination between agencies has gotten problems taken care of quicker because agencies can share information easily and provide tips on other violations when they follow up on complaints, said Raj Patel, spokesman for the county’s Building and Safety Department, which is part of the Nuisance Abatement Team. “Typically, we go out on a complaint within 24 hours, but sometimes it may take a couple of days,” Patel said. Aggressive police work and pushing property owners to voluntarily comply with county codes is also working to improve quality-of-life issues – from unkempt, junk-filled yards to graffiti to crime problems, Patel said. “Often people don’t think we’re doing something about \ when we are. It’s just that there is a due process we must follow,” he said. “We can’t go on someone’s property for visual blight. Only if there’s an immediate safety hazard.” Patel said his department spends a lot of time working with owners to persuade them to comply with county codes. “It all boils down to people, not stuff,” he said, adding that judges tend to sympathize with a homeowner who is at least showing some effort to comply, even if slowly. “One person’s junk is another person’s treasure,” Patel said. “To remove junk off someone’s property, we have to go through a judge. People have rights, so you have to prove to a judge that it’s a public nuisance. That’s not easy to do.” pam.wight@sgvn.com (562) 698-0955, Ext. 3029 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’For years, that was not the case, he added. “We’d have meetings and nothing would get done. \ show up and sit in the back, doodling in their notebooks, then later give us the runaround.” For example, an alleyway off Laurel Avenue had overflowing Dumpsters surrounded by abandoned couches, graffiti-covered carports and even a burned-out car and garage. It had sat that way for eight months, residents said. Now, most of the garages sport clean white walls, the Dumpsters are couch-free and the burned garage has been replaced with a new garage. An abandoned building near Laurel Avenue on Telegraph Road that for years had attracted criminal activity was recently torn down. SOUTH WHITTIER – Quality-of-life improvements in South Whittier have traditionally been slow in coming. But now some residents say they are starting to see results after a concerted effort by a joint task force of county agencies that has spent the past year focusing on blighted properties, graffiti and street crime. The county’s Nuisance Abatement Team and the South Whittier Law Enforcement Task Force have brought officials from more than 10 agencies together to focus on those issues. The efforts seem to be making a dent in what to some residents had seemed like intractable problems, said South Whittier resident Jose Mercado, captain of the Telechron Neighborhood Watch. “It had felt for years like our complaints fell on deaf ears. But for about the past year, ever since we got a new field deputy in our area, they’ve turned some things around,” Mercado said. last_img read more

first_img Matic one of two players for sale with ‘two Premier League clubs’ interested latest 6 Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:52Loaded: 8.81%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:52 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreen 6 Steve Gerrard was the last player to leave the club Getty – Contributor Liverpool are returning to Istanbul 14 years after their Champions League triumph over AC Milan.Rafael Benitez’s side famously came back from 3-0 down at half-time to win on penalties in 2005.They return to Turkey as the current European champions to face Chelsea in the UEFA Super Cup, with commentary live on talkSPORT. LATEST Fans go wild as Liverpool celebrate their Champions League victory with bus parade Milan BarosLeft for Aston Villa immediately after the Istanbul win and later played for Lyon, Portsmouth and Galatasaray before three times rejoining Banik Ostrava – the club he originally left in 2001 to join Liverpool – amid stints with Turkish side Antalyaspor and Czech outfits Mlada Boleslav and Slovan Liberec.Dietmar HamannLeft for Manchester City after Liverpool’s 2006 FA Cup win, having initially agreed to join Bolton, before finishing his playing career in 2011 at Milton Keynes Dons where he was player-coach.Hamann joined Leicester as first-team coach before a short, ill-fated spell as manager of newly relegated Conference Premier side Stockport. Now a media pundit.Vladimir SmicerHis last Liverpool appearance was the final, in which he scored, and his career could never match up to those heights. He spent two seasons with Bordeaux before returning to first professional club Slavia Prague and retiring in May 2010. Steve FinnanSpent an injury-affected season at Espanyol after leaving Anfield in 2008 and then joined Portsmouth, retiring after their 2010 FA Cup final defeat to Chelsea. Currently involved with London-based construction firm Finnan Developments.Djimi TraoreAfter spells at Charlton, Birmingham, Monaco and Marseille, the Frenchman spent two years in the United States with the Seattle Sounders before retiring in 2014. He is now one of the assistant coaches with the Major League Soccer club. Getty – Contributor LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS deals New job Former Crystal Palace and West Brom manager Pardew takes over at Dutch strugglers Luis GarciaAfter his departure for Atletico Madrid in 2007 the Spaniard spent two seasons in the Spanish capital before spells at Racing Santander, Panathinaikos and Mexican sides Puebla Club and Universidad Nacional.He announced his retirement in January 2014 only to make a short-lived comeback for newly formed Indian Super League franchise Atletico de Kolkata, with another brief stint following in Australia with the Central Coast Mariners in 2016.Xabi AlonsoPlayed a pivotal role for Real Madrid for five seasons after his Liverpool exit in 2009, culminating in the club’s 10th Champions League victory in 2014. Alonso then spent three years patrolling Bayern Munich’s midfield and returned to Madrid to coach Real’s under-14s in 2018 before moving last month back to his first professional club, Real Sociedad, to take charge of their youth team.Harry KewellThe Australian left Anfield for Galatasaray in 2008 for three seasons and returned home to play for Melbourne Victory and Melbourne Heart – either side of a short spell with Qatari’s Al-Gharafa – where he retired in March 2014.He has since taken his first steps in management with Watford’s youth team, Crawley and most recently Notts County. Man United transfer news live: Haaland ‘wants a change’, two players off in January Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Liverpool news live: Klopp reveals when Minamino will play and issues injury update Dietmar Hamann and John Arne Risse celebrate in Istanbul in 2005 FAREWELL OFF AFP – Getty What every Premier League club’s fans dream of this Christmas BIG PRESENTS UP TOP Liverpool came from 3-0 down to beat AC Milan on penalties Jerzy Dudek was a hero in the penalty shootout before being replaced in Liverpool’s goal by Pep Reina AFP – Getty 6 targets 6 Sami HyypiaHe bid farewell to Anfield in 2009 and headed to Bayer Leverkusen where he finished his playing career before becoming assistant manager and then manager.After being sacked in April 2014 he became Brighton boss in June but lasted just six months. He spent the 2015/16 season in charge of Swiss side FC Zurich before being dismissed. He now has a keen interest in ice hockey and motocross.Jamie CarragherThe centre-back retired in 2013 after 737 appearances for Liverpool and has since become a Sky Sports pundit.John Arne RiiseRiise spent three years with Roma after leaving Anfield in 2008 before returning to England with Fulham.He then went on to have spells with APOEL in Cyprus, Indian club Delhi Dynamos, Norwegian outfit Aalesund and Indian side Chennaiyin before hanging up his boots.He had a brief spell as technical director of Maltese club Birkirkara earlier this year before resigning due to personal reasons. Getty – Contributor Vladimir Smicer scored one of the goals that helped Liverpool come back from 3-0 down Steven GerrardThe final player from that night in Istanbul to depart Anfield, Gerrard left his boyhood club in 2015 to tackle a new challenge with the Los Angeles Galaxy.He spent a year in America before retiring in November 2016, and 18 months later was handed the managerial reins at Scottish club Rangers. 6 6 Getty Images – Getty Here is what happened to those players following that unbelievable night.Jerzy DudekLeft Liverpool in 2007 to become Iker Casillas’ deputy at Real Madrid, where he spent four seasons before retiring in 2011. Djibril CisseEnjoyed a nomadic existence after leaving Anfield in 2006, with stints at Marseille, Sunderland, Panathinaikos, Lazio, QPR, Al-Gharafa and Kuban Krasnodar before returning to his homeland with Bastia and then briefly Saint-Pierroise.Having announced his retirement due to injury in October 2015, he hoped to make a comeback but announced his retirement again in February 2017 and told Yahoo Sport, where he was set to work as a pundit: “I’m going to give myself body and soul to my career as a DJ, a producer, and as a pundit, as well as develop my line of clothing.”He came out of retirement again to play for Swiss side Yverdon two years ago and then Italian Serie D team AC Vicenza 1902 last year. Redknapp calls Son ‘petulant’, but Holloway says red card for Rudiger kick was ‘soft’ Steven Gerrard and Rafael Benitez celebrate with the Champions League trophy in 2005 Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January Manager: Rafael BenitezDisagreements with the owners and failing results resulted in the Spaniard leaving Anfield in 2010. A similar scenario saw him sacked after just six months in charge at Inter Milan.He succeeded Roberto Di Matteo at Chelsea despite being deeply unpopular at Stamford Bridge because of his Liverpool connections but did lead them to Europa League glory in 2013.He then joined Napoli shortly afterwards, winning the Coppa Italia in his first season, and guiding them to within one goal of the 2015 Europa League final. Named Real Madrid boss in June 2015 but lasted little over six months, before in March 2016 being handed the Newcastle reins. Could not save the Magpies from relegation but guided them straight back up, before stepping down when his contract expired in June this year. Benitez was named manager of Chinese side Dalian Yifang last month.last_img read more

first_imgBertie Auld has described Celtic great Billy McNeill as a credit to the club and an inspirational figure.McNeill died on Monday at the age of 79, following a long struggle with dementia and figures across the footballing world have been paying tribute to the iconic Scot.Auld, a fellow member of the Celtic team that won the European Cup in 1967, had a friendship with McNeill that stretched back 60 years and said the former defender could have been a success in any field.Asked what marked the Celtic captain out from others, Auld told STV: “He was educated. He could have been anything he wanted to be. “I met when he was 17. Big Jock [Stein, the Celtic manager] signed him. Jock recommended him and signed him.“I had just finished training and he was at the bottom of the tunnel, so I went over and shook his hand and said ‘Great, son. I hope you enjoy it’.“He was very articulate in everything that he did. He was a credit to Celtic Football Club.”McNeill’s leadership qualities were a key part of Celtic’s success as they won nine successive league titles and a host of domestic cups. Auld said his captain would keep his talented teammates in line and drive them on to victories. “That’s why he was such an important person,” he said. “On the park he could see us carrying on, and you would never ever notice it during the game, but John Clark or Billy would just come up and have a wee whisper – ‘enough of the kidding on’.“The chest was out and he was six-foot 40-something. I promise you, walking down next to him you felt that comfortable.”McNeill went on to become a successful Celtic manager, clinching four league titles over two spells and a domestic double in the club’s centenary year of 1988.He added: “He always loved Celtic and wanted to manage Celtic and rightly so. That’s the type of character he was.“He was a great captain. If things weren’t going right, when Bob Kelly was the chairman, Billy could talk to him. I couldn’t, he would have papped me out of the door!”McNeill was capped by Scotland 29 times and wore the armband for the national team, but his friend said he should have had more reward for his talents at international level.“I didn’t think he got as many caps as he should have because he was outstanding as a player,” Auld said. “All you have to do is look at the history of him.“As far as I was concerned, he had more than people appreciated. The Celtic support appreciated him but he wasn’t one that came out with stories to tell or that would have made headlines. He let his football do that.“Everybody looked up to him.”last_img read more

first_imgEditor’s Note: The following missive is a response from the National Association of Shoplifting Prevention (NASP) to the class action lawsuit filed against a number of major retailers on April 9, which asserts that the retailers participated in a racketeering scheme with Utah-based Corrective Education Company (CEC).We write in response to the suit filed against CEC and its participating retailers yesterday that seizes on the California Superior Court’s earlier finding of extortion based on California state law.Without regard to or comment on the guilt or innocence of any party, the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention (NASP) views this lawsuit as yet another challenge to retailers’ efforts to address a community-wide burden that they are, by and large, left to shoulder on their own in jurisdictions around the country and especially in California post-Proposition 47.- Sponsor – Moreover, as an organization whose mission and focus is offender accountability and education, NASP is particularly troubled to note that, once again, this suit discounts (and thus excuses) any role or responsibility on the part of the alleged offenders. The suit misleadingly refers to alleged offenders as “extortion targets” in another example of the role reversal that paints retailers as villains rather than victims.It is essential as an industry, that we continually bring the focus back to the community-wide value of retail/criminal justice collaboration to address the proliferation of retail theft holistically and cooperatively. The lack of resources available to address shoplifting and retail theft in the criminal justice system, coupled with the continually increasing felony thresholds around the country, have resulted in an alarming de facto decriminalization of shoplifting. This not only encourages offenders to continue to shoplift but also empowers them to move on to greater and often more violent levels of retail theft.The nature of this suit brings into specific relief the value of the upcoming panel discussion and subsequent breakout session at the RILA Asset Protection Conference in Orlando on Tuesday morning, May 1. Beginning with a General Session at 9:30 followed by a 10:45 breakout, retail, criminal justice, academic, and community experts will discuss retail asset protection challenges and share their legal opinions, expertise and experience in using, challenging and defending programs that seek to use education to address shoplifter recidivism while preserving police and public resources for communities.Panelists will examine the value of non-traditional and civil alternatives to holistically address retail crime inflation and begin to fill the gaps left by fixed and shrinking public resources. The ultimate goal is to identify model program policies and practices that, when carefully and collaboratively vetted and executed, will meet the needs of all parties involved—from offenders to retailers to criminal justice and community.Panelists: Paul Jaeckle, vice president loss prevention, Meijer Honorable David Larson, presiding judge, Federal Way Municipal Court Attorney General Curtis Hill, State of Indiana Chief Deputy Attorney General Aaron Negangard, State of Indiana Kevin Kolbye, assistant police chief, Arlington Police Department John Rappaport, assistant professor of law, University of Chicago George Kelemen, president and chief executive officer, Texas State Retail Association Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

first_imgHow to make a cave fish in just a few thousand years By Virginia MorellApr. 3, 2017 , 12:00 PM How long does it take for a cave fish to evolve from an open-water swimmer? Only a few thousand years, according to a new study. Scientists used to think that ice age glaciers covering northern Europe had prevented fish from colonizing the continents’ caves. Such species were thought to live no farther north than Pennsylvania’s Nippenose Valley. But a new cave-dwelling fish discovered in southern Germany 2 years ago is turning that assumption on its head. The pale, tiny fish with long, whiskerlike barbs sprouting from its head (above) is a new species of loach, as yet unnamed. It’s also the first cave fish to be found in Europe, 760 kilometers farther north than those in Pennsylvania. Until 12,000 years ago, Europe and its caves were buried beneath glacial ice, which blocked any connection between above- and underground waterways. But as the glaciers retreated, sinkholes and springs formed around Germany’s upper Danube, connecting the river to extensive caves and streams 250 kilometers below. Some fish made their way in, becoming smaller, with pale scaleless bodies, large nostrils, and tiny eyes—all adaptations for living in the dark, the scientists report in today’s issue of Current Biology. Based on their genetic analysis, the scientists say the cave loach is a close relative of the darkly mottled stone loach, which is twice the size of the cave fish, and still swims in the sunny, open waters of the Danube River.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more