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first_imgThe slow death of the 9-5 workday, together with the arrival of the new FLSA overtime rules, which do into effect on December 1, could create one of the bigger wage-and-hour pitfalls for employers in 2017 and beyond.Less flexibility to complete work outside of normal work hours.A few months ago, both The Washington Post (here) and SHRM (here) ran stories about how the new overtime rules could limit job flexibility. Citing a SHRM survey, The Washington Post story noted that 67% of HR pros thought the new regulation would decrease workplace flexibility and autonomy.These survey results to do not marry well with the latest survey from CareerBuilder, which found that nearly half of workers ages 18 to 24 keep working after business hours, with just over 40% checking and answering work emails outside of the office. A higher proportion of workers in age groups 45 to 54 (65%) and 55 and older (61%) agreed that the typical eight-hour work day was a thing of the past.What are your options as an employer?According to the DOL, you have at least three:Raise salary and keep the employee exempt from overtime: Employers may choose to raise the salaries of employees to at or above the salary level to maintain their exempt status, if those employees meet the duties test (that is, the duties are truly those of an executive, administrative or professional employee). This option works for employees who have salaries close to the new salary level and regularly work overtime.Pay overtime in addition to the employee’s current salary when necessary:Employers also can continue to pay their newly overtime-eligible employees the same salary, and pay them overtime whenever they work more than 40 hours in a week. This approach works for employees who work 40 hours or fewer in a typical workweek, but have occasional spikes that require overtime for which employers can plan and budget the extra pay during those periods. Remember that there is no requirement to convert employees from salaried to hourly in order to calculate their overtime pay!Evaluate and realign hours and staff workload: Employers can ensure that workload distribution, time and staffing levels are all managed appropriately for their white-collar workers who earn below the salary threshold. For example, employers may hire additional workers.And while the DOL emphasizes that, nothing in the new rules would hamstring an employer’s ability to control when employees perform work, the DOL isn’t exactly throwing a pity party for employers who have non-exempt employees who perform work outside of traditional business hours.So, how can you manage a great number of non-exempt employees who want more workplace flexibility?As a corollary to the three options listed above, employers will need to re-think their rules on non-exempt employees performing work outside of business hours.  This must include, among other things: (a) whether to permit it; (b) the circumstances under which it will be allowed; and (c) how to track those hours. Frankly, the framework isn’t much different than it is now, except you’ll need a wider net to catch your share of the millions of additional employees who become non-exempt on December 1.Or, maybe, the new rules will strike a blow to workplace flexibility.Originally posted on the Employer Handbook Blog.last_img read more

first_imgEditor’s Note: The following missive is a response from the National Association of Shoplifting Prevention (NASP) to the class action lawsuit filed against a number of major retailers on April 9, which asserts that the retailers participated in a racketeering scheme with Utah-based Corrective Education Company (CEC).We write in response to the suit filed against CEC and its participating retailers yesterday that seizes on the California Superior Court’s earlier finding of extortion based on California state law.Without regard to or comment on the guilt or innocence of any party, the National Association for Shoplifting Prevention (NASP) views this lawsuit as yet another challenge to retailers’ efforts to address a community-wide burden that they are, by and large, left to shoulder on their own in jurisdictions around the country and especially in California post-Proposition 47.- Sponsor – Moreover, as an organization whose mission and focus is offender accountability and education, NASP is particularly troubled to note that, once again, this suit discounts (and thus excuses) any role or responsibility on the part of the alleged offenders. The suit misleadingly refers to alleged offenders as “extortion targets” in another example of the role reversal that paints retailers as villains rather than victims.It is essential as an industry, that we continually bring the focus back to the community-wide value of retail/criminal justice collaboration to address the proliferation of retail theft holistically and cooperatively. The lack of resources available to address shoplifting and retail theft in the criminal justice system, coupled with the continually increasing felony thresholds around the country, have resulted in an alarming de facto decriminalization of shoplifting. This not only encourages offenders to continue to shoplift but also empowers them to move on to greater and often more violent levels of retail theft.The nature of this suit brings into specific relief the value of the upcoming panel discussion and subsequent breakout session at the RILA Asset Protection Conference in Orlando on Tuesday morning, May 1. Beginning with a General Session at 9:30 followed by a 10:45 breakout, retail, criminal justice, academic, and community experts will discuss retail asset protection challenges and share their legal opinions, expertise and experience in using, challenging and defending programs that seek to use education to address shoplifter recidivism while preserving police and public resources for communities.Panelists will examine the value of non-traditional and civil alternatives to holistically address retail crime inflation and begin to fill the gaps left by fixed and shrinking public resources. The ultimate goal is to identify model program policies and practices that, when carefully and collaboratively vetted and executed, will meet the needs of all parties involved—from offenders to retailers to criminal justice and community.Panelists: Paul Jaeckle, vice president loss prevention, Meijer Honorable David Larson, presiding judge, Federal Way Municipal Court Attorney General Curtis Hill, State of Indiana Chief Deputy Attorney General Aaron Negangard, State of Indiana Kevin Kolbye, assistant police chief, Arlington Police Department John Rappaport, assistant professor of law, University of Chicago George Kelemen, president and chief executive officer, Texas State Retail Association Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

first_imgThe Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) targets the use of IoT for industrial and manufacturing applications.  It is expected to be able it help businesses improve their supply chain and logistics management.  McKinsey estimates that IIoT will have a $6.2 trillion impact on the economy by 2025.  The World Economic Forum estimated that in the electric utility sector that IIoT stimulated $1.3 trillion of activity.Eddie Amos, VP of industrial applications and CTO at GE Digital, said that “the Industrial IoT is already transforming industry. Digital industrial leaders like Exelon, Hess, and Qantas that got on board early have been rewarded with improvements to their top and bottom lines. Estimates show productivity gains from the Industrial IoT adding a sizable $10 trillion to $15 trillion to global GDP – in coming years.”But a Manufacturing Report in 2017 found though that many manufacturing businesses aren’t yet on board. As many as 77 percent of manufacturers and distributors don’t see a need for IIoT.  Many businesses, especially small and mid-sized, think that they don’t have the time or resources to make changes.last_img read more

first_imgWeek 13 and Oklahoma State has its second bye week of the season. I’m thankful for that as the stress is low and the consumption of other games high. There is still plenty to keep an eye on if you’re an OSU fan though as Washington and Washington State play a very important game in Pullman on Friday (Go Coogs!) And Ohio State and Michigan play the most talked about* college football game in history.*by ESPNThanks as always to Ryan Hartwig for his work.Weekend Watch Guide: Week 13 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgBrad Underwood gets it.Last March, when he was introduced as OSU’s next head coach by Mike Holder, he stepped to the podium with an emphasis on remembering the tradition that was Oklahoma State basketball. And he’s done a fantastic job of embracing OSU’s history even since.This weekend marks Legends Weekend, where OSU hosts players from past years and celebrates their contribution and the history of Cowboy basketball.Here’s a video of Underwood’s address to the attendees of a Legends dinner hosted by OSU. This guy knows how to win the room — from his attempt to recruit of Joey Graham for tomorrow’s game against Texas Tech to his ribbing of senior sharpshooter Phil Forte.Check it [email protected] thanking the attendees of tonight’s Legends Weekend! https://t.co/QRmlDMTo2K— Cowboy Basketball (@OSUMBB) February 25, 2017 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgOklahoma State’s fourth commitment of the 2018 class came last week. And boy was it a big one. Rising junior prospect Hunter Anthony, a 6-foot-7 offensive tackle prospect from Tuttle, America, joined the commitment list. It’s the first offensive line recruit of the class, and the first commitment for Josh Henson.Anthony committed just within an hour of announcing his offer from the Cowboys, calling it a “dream offer.” But he didn’t necessarily grow up as an OSU fan.“I’m a Chicago Bears fan and just a Big 12 fan in general,” Anthony said. “There is a long tie from OSU to Tuttle football and it just seemed like the perfect fit. I enjoy the coaches and I trust them. I believe with lots of hard work we will win several Big 12 trophies.”Anthony doesn’t lack for confidence — and why should he? He’s the biggest, most dominating player nearly every time he steps on the field. Listed at 320 pounds, he’s a big body but versatile tackle who has good movement.Anthony’s commitment to OSU came in part because of the coaching changes at Oklahoma State. When OSU parted ways with Greg Adkins, formerly one of his main recruiters, it put his status in a bit of limbo. But the Cowboys clearly made him a top priority in the class and offered early, and he noted that the return of Josh Henson was huge in his decision.“It was awesome,” Anthony said of Henson’s return. “I went to Missouri to see him [Henson was the OC at Mizzou] and then he was here last year. It was very exciting when he was announced as the OL coach. Just an awesome fit. He’s my kind of coach. He knows how to push and still be a great role model for me.”Anthony said his work ethic is a key element of his game that will help his skills translate to Big 12 football. With offers from Iowa State and Kansas, he’s shutting it down and sticking with the Pokes. He might turn out to be one of the gems of OSU’s 2018 recruiting class. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

first_imgRT2Teven JenkinsR. Fr. The offensive line has been — and almost always is — one of the most underappreciated position groups broadly speaking. When they’re doing a good job and producing 1,000-yard rushers like last season, the running backs get the credit. (Justice Hill, for example, was a freshman All-American.) But when there’s no production out of the backfield and tailbacks can’t find a hole, or when Daxx Garman is getting pummeled after snapping the ball, the brunt of the blame falls on the offensive line.Sometimes it’s fair, sometimes not.With the end of spring camp upon us, we’ve got a pretty good idea about the pieces offensive line coach Josh Henson is working with. And the high expectations for the 2017-18 season are largely tied to the overall strength the offensive line group should be. The bullies up front return three starters from last season at center, tackle, and guard.After landing Cal graduate transfer offensive tackle Aaron Cochran and solidifying Mason Rudolph’s blindside, it’s time to update our new depth chart projections for the offensive line much like we did with the cornerback position group on Thursday. C1Brad LundbladeSr. RG2Shane RichardsSr. C2Johnny WilsonR. Soph. LG2Arlington HambrightJr. Think Aaron Cochran wasn’t a big get for Mike Gundy? Think again. The 6-foot-8, 350-pounder from Cal is a plug-and-play monster at left tackle. He might’ve needed OSU as much as OSU needed him, too, which could’ve been the reason he chose Stillwater. Not only does OSU need a left tackle to replace Victor Salako, but he needs a place to showcase himself for one more year before the NFL comes calling.Cochran played in 28 games and started 16 over the last three years for Cal. In 2016, he played in 11 games with a career-high 10 starts at left tackle. He’s set to graduate in May and will be available this summer.In the meantime, redshirt freshman Dylan Galloway has been manning the fort. But unless players are can’t miss recruits, it’s difficult to expect a player that young to start at tackle in the Big 12. He has a bright future but if OSU has it their way, Galloway will play a reserve role this season.Left guard is definitely set with Keyes so Hambright, the junior college transfer who played left tackle, is here only for depth. He could play left tackle, his most utilized position, but at 6-foot-5 305 pounds, he could be a big-time depth booster at left guard, too. The mobility will allow OSU versatility it needs and could give Keyes much-needed breathers in blowouts without giving up quality.At both the right tackle and center position there is no drama. Crabtree will start the season as will Lundblade. Redshirt sophomore Johnny Wilson will play backup duties for Lundblade but beyond Crabtree is where my confidence level dwindles in the bunch. There’s not a solid option at right tackle that has valuable experience. I’ve slotted Teven Jenkins, a redshirt freshman, behind Crabtree. But to be honest I think Hambright or even Shane Richards could fill in at right tackle with no drop-off.Josh Henson has the pieces to put a quality product on the gridiron. It was noted on Friday that Crabtree and Larry Williams, both projected starts covering up the right side of the line, will not play in Saturday’s spring game and listed as inactive. But assuming they are both at full health, I think OSU fans should feel good about the state of the offensive line. LT2Dylan GallowayR. Fr.center_img While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. RT1Zach CrabtreeR. Sr. DEPTH CHARTPLAYERCLASS LG1Marcus KeyesR. Soph. LT1Aaron CochranGr. Tr. RG1Larry WilliamsR. Sr.last_img read more

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Title town? Well, Oklahoma State will be able to claim it even if it doesn’t win any NCAA Championships in the next four years. It was announced on Tuesday that several national titles would be decided in Stillwater over the next few years. Here are the six that will be doled out in Payne County.2018 NCAA Men’s and Women’s Division I Golf Championships (Karsten Creek)2020 NCAA Men’s and Women’s Division I Tennis Championships (Michael and Anne Greenwood Tennis Center)2020 NCAA Men’s and Women’s NCAA Division I Cross Country Championships (OSU Cross Country Course)OSU will also host a men’s and women’s cross country regional in 2019, men’s golf regional in 2021 and women’s golf regional in 2022.“We’re thankful to everyone who was involved in bringing these championship events to Oklahoma State and this opportunity means a lot to us.” OSU Athletic Director Mike Holder said in a statement. “We are committed to providing every student-athlete who comes here with a memorable championship experience.“The people at OSU and in the community make Stillwater a great destination for events as prestigious as these. There are so few opportunities for an NCAA championship event to be played on or near a campus, so we don’t take this lightly.”The last time the NCAA golf title was held in Stillwater was in 2011 when Augusta State beat Georgia in the final and Patrick Reed laid waste to everything he looked at. The women’s golf title has never been held there although it was held at Tulsa Country Club as recently as 2014.“We built Karsten Creek to help our players achieve their dreams, prepare them for championships and to host championships ourselves,” OSU head coach Alan Bratton said in a statement. “We are grateful to the NCAA for trusting us to host such a great event and now it is up to us to put on a good show.”The tennis news is even more exciting as Oklahoma State has been rewarded for their sparkling new facilities.We’re very excited to be hosting the 2020 NCAA Championships at the GTC! Check out our video of the announcement. #okstate pic.twitter.com/nAcqyh95SG— OSU Women’s Tennis (@CowgirlTennis) April 18, 2017“One of our goals in building the Michael and Anne Greenwood Tennis Center was to host an NCAA Championship, and to see that become a reality is very rewarding,” director of tennis and head OSU women’s tennis coach Chris Young said in a statement. “We have built a strong fan base and I am excited for them to welcome the best in college tennis to Stillwater.”Fun times for those who love college sports. I’ve become a big fan of the NCAA golf championships and will likely make my way up there next year to check out the action in person. Hopefully the Cowboys (and Cowgirls) are contending in a lot of these events. That would make some good news even sweeter as these competitions unfold in the years to come.last_img read more

first_imgBench: 320 poundsSquat: 450 poundsHang Clean: 260 poundsThat’s only half of the battle though. He said about as much work is being directed toward his grades to make sure they’re up and ready for the transition to college.McCune said he is thinking about taking several roads as far as his major is concerned. He might do general studies. He might do business and management. He might do like Chris Lacy and go with engineering, he said.A lot of the Cowboys are cut from the same cloth, he said. McCune has been in contact with several of the other recruits in his class from around the Dallas-Fort Worth area. He and the Wallace twins have talked. Same with Thabo Mwaniki and Tre Sterling, another athlete recruited as a safety, who goes to high school just 15 minutes away.They’ve all come together as friends. Kind of like a summer camp.“Those guys are pretty easy to be around and very funny dudes,” McCune said. “And we all are the same kinda person. I see it as the opportunity to start a lifelong brotherhood.”Still, he keeps coming back to seeing his locker for the first time. The realization of becoming a collegiate student-athlete at OSU.“I’m ready to be there,” McCune said. “I’m ready to be a Cowboy.” It’s a thought that he said crosses his mind a lot.Walking into the Oklahoma State football locker room in the depths of Boone Pickens Stadium and arriving at his prepped locker for the next four to five years is what incoming 2017 freshman safety Kris McCune said he is most excited for.“That’s one thing that keeps me motivated,” McCune told PFB on Thursday.That day is coming. It’s June 4. He said he is counting down the days in his head but there isn’t an app on his phone to give him the time left down to the second. He said that would just be too much.“I think if I had that, I’d be too anxious,” McCune said. “I just try to take it day by day.”McCune has been busy since National Signing Day when he officially became part of the Cowboys’ 2017 recruiting class. A lot of that work has been in the gym. McCune has set some weight goals, and they’re steep, particularly for a 200-pound freshman safety. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more